Part 1

Start Finish Distance (Km) Notes
Thai border Phibun Mang Sa Han 42
Phibun Mang Sa Han Ban Huai Kham Yung 69
Ban Huai Kham Yung Road 226 on the way to Surin 71
Road 226 on the way to Surin Surin 75
Surin Ban Chaloem Phra Kiat 91
Ban Chaloem Phra Kiat Nr Ban Nong Hua Raet 66
Nr Ban Nong Hua Raet Nr Bo Tong 92
Nr Bo Tong Pak Chong 27
Pak Chong Khao Yai national park 32
Khao Yai national park Khao Yai national park 10
Khao Yai national park Bangkok 41 train from Pak Chong
Bangkok Prachuap Khiri Khan 0 by train
Prachuap Khiri Khan Ban Krut 79
Ban Krut Pak Klang 66
Pak Klang Somewhere on road 41 82
Somewhere on road 41 Lamae beach 73
Lamae beach Wat Suan Mokkh 68
Wat Suan Mokkh Surat Thani 43
Surat Thani Koh Samui 26 night ferry crossing
Koh Samui Bangkok 24 ferry to Don Sak then bus to Bangkok
Bangkok Bangkok 27
cycling days distance
Total Thailand 20 1103

Part 2

Start Finish Distance (Km) Notes
Thai Border Road 351 63
Road 351 Road 304 nr Phanom Sarakham 80
Road 304 nr Phanom Sarakham Bangkok 93
Cycling round Bangkok 25
cycling days distance
Total Thailand 4 198

Cycling in Thailand – facts and figures

I  spent two periods in Thailand, the first one between the 02 December 2016 and the 16 of January 2017 (46 days) and the second one between the 13 May 2017 and the 28 of May 2017 (16 days). Altogether I cycled 1,378 Km (856 miles) in Thailand covering an average of 60 Km a day. The longest distance I cycled on a single day was 93 Km and the shortest 10 Km.

During that time I spent 632 euros. The average daily cost in Thailand was 10.19 euros.

Eating out includes not only meals but any ready made food whilst groceries are mainly buying ingredients to cook my own meals.

Communication covers the cost of SIM cards and postage to letters home and Transport are mainly ferries to the islands and a couple of buses.

This is the breakdown of the accomodation



Love and Friendship in Thailand

The thought of Karen leaving became more real once we crossed the border into Thailand. Staying present in the moment became more difficult however much we tried, it was like someting had switched in our minds: we were going to Bangkok and Karen would fly back to the UK.

We didn’t know what to expect from Thailand but were struck by the marked difference with Laos. As soon as we crossed the border we found ourselves riding in smooth roads, 7/11 supermarkets everywhere, more cars in one day that we had seen in the whole time in the neighbouring country and …fat people. We had entered a more developed, westernised country. It is not surprising that Europeans love Thailand, it is easy and comfortable country, there are familiar things everywhere and at the same time it is different enough to be exotic.

Smooth roads

King Bhumibol Adulyadej had died a couple of months before we entered the country. At the time of his death, he was the longest living reigning monarch in the world, he had been king for 70 years and 126 days. The reaction of the Thai people was moving, everywhere we went people dressed in black, supermarkets emptied at 7pm when workers and customers went out to pray by the altars set up at the entrance to honour the dead king. In Bangkok they moved the location of the bus station to be near the palace making it easier for travellers to pay their respects to the king and food and drink was distributed free for everyone.

People dressed in black everywhere we went
Shrines in many places
His image everywhere from schools to art galleries

We wanted to make sure that Thailand wasn’t just a ride to get to Bangkok and went to visit Khao Yai National Park where we hoped to see elephants and other wild life. Excited we climbed and climbed amongst beautiful vegetation. Since the Pamir, green has become synonimous with life and I find myself thinking how I can transform my London garden to make it a constant reminder of my travels, which plant will withstand the London climate or which one I could use as an alternative.  Each time I think about coming home I find myself worrying about what it will be like crossing the border, how Brexit is going to impact on my life. Brexit has become a stormy cloud on this, otherwise, magical journey;  questions surface as I cycle along – should I go back home now whilst I still can? should I take the citizenship exam? will they give me problems at the border when I try to get back in?  Stubbornly I choose se to ignore the whole thing, I refuse to give up on my dream. My garden and Brexit were filling my mind as we climbed amongst the majestic trees of the jungle.

Climbing amongst majestic trees
In thick jungle
Interesting road signs

Our stay in the park wasn’t quite what we had expected, it was a Bank Holiday weekend and thousands of Thai people flooded to the park to spend it outdoors. They came with their barbeques, their cold boxes, their music. Soon our little tents were dwarfed amongst their huge ones and the air was filled with food smells, the sound of children running around,  adults laughing and a general festival atmosphere. Of course we didn’t see animals with all that noise but seeing the light of dawn filling the day with colour, listening to the shrieks of the monkeys in the trees, soaking up the atmosphere made our two days there very special.

Camping was amongst hundreds of locals

And then the day came when it was time for Karen to leave, it was emotional . We had shared two months full of laughter and adventures throught which we got to know one another and our friendship grew. We said goodby with the promise to have anoter stretch together in the future. I saw the back of her taxi disapear in the crowded streets of Bangkok and experienced a sense of loss.

Exploring the many faces of Bangkok – temples
And everyday chores in her railwayside home

It was time to be on my own again but not for long, I would cycle south to Koh Samui to meet with my friend the adventurous Jenniffer Murray who had invited me to spend Xmas with her family. I first met Jeffa when I took part in the Atacama Desert Crossing and felt instantly in love with her indomitable spirit, her zest for life and adventure, her love of challenges, her can do attitude. Something about her chimed powefully within me and bridged our ideological differences.

To cycle to Surat Thani I chose small roads that took me to small beach villages through coconut and palm plantations. The crossing in the slow night ferry from Surat Thani to Koh Samui was perfect. I bought the ticket from a surly man parked by the boat with a parasol and sat to watch the boat being loaded with all sort of goods, scooters coming with packages big and small. When it got close to the 11pm departure time I took Foxtrot on board and settled myself in the wood panelled top section of the ferry where simple mattreses and pillows were provided. Snuggled in my sleeping bag I soon went to sleep with the rocking of the boat and only woke up when we were landing in the island just after dawn.

Cycling through coconut groves on my way to Jeffa
Trees full of fruit
On the way I met a procession of pilgrim monks

It was wonderful to see Jeffa again and be welcomed into the heart of  her family where I stayed not only for Xmas but also for New Year. I was overwhelmed by their generosity,  I had a stocking amongst theirs and presents wrapped under the tropical plants disguised as Xmas trees; I had a turkey dinner and thanks to Siena, her grand daughter I was able to have the 12 grapes of new year; I walked in the beach with Jeffa in the early morning whilst everyone else in the house was still sleeping and  I learned magic tricks from Simon, Jeffa’s husband. I was showered with warmth and friendship and by the time I left I felt fully rested.

With Jeffa and her family
Leaving Jeffa and Simon’s home on the 1 January

And there was more love to come. My daughter Amaya and her boyfriend John were coming to Bangkok to spend some days with me. In Bangkok I found a great hostel/bike shop run by Thai cycle tourers, Spinning Bear. Whilst  I waited for them with anticipation and found yet another little family. In the hostel I met with Lontxo Rojo who has been cycling for nearly 20 years all over the world, the life on the road etched in his face, years of self suficiency shaping his character and lots of stories to tell. He is heading back to the Basque country with the intention to stay – how do you get used to the walls of a house after so many years of the big outdoors? I have been away for a fraction of his time and sometimes wonder what it will be like for me and can’t quite picture it.

With a great group of cyclists in Spinning Bear enjoying Spanish omelette

And the day arrived when I met Amaya and John and time flew by. We went to the small island of Koh Kood and spent some precious time together that felt too short. After months of anticipation the days went in a heart beat and yet each of them went by at a slow pace – slow breakfasts, walks to waterfalls, sitting in the sun,catching up on news from home, snorkelling… How can time be running so fast and slow at the same time? It had been a year since I had seen them in Istambul but when I saw their smiling faces at the airport it felt that had been only yesterday. As I cycle along I experience this seemingly contradiction often and ponder about this poorly understood time-space dimension.

Arriving in Koh Kood
Amaya taking her PADI whilst John and I snorkelled
Happy days

It was heart wrenching to say goodby to them but their visit and being showered with love was the priceless gift they left with me. I didn’t take this for granted and I knew I was one of the luckiest women on earth.